Chastening

  • 1 chastening — index condemnation (blame), correction (punishment), disciplinary (punitory), discipline (punishment) …

    Law dictionary

  • 2 chastening — [[t]tʃe͟ɪsənɪŋ[/t]] ADJ GRADED A chastening experience makes you regret that you have behaved badly or stupidly. From this chastening experience he learnt some useful lessons …

    English dictionary

  • 3 Chastening — Chasten Chas ten (ch[=a] s n), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Chastened} ( s nd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Chastening}.] [OE. chastien, OF. Chastier, F. Ch?tier, fr. L. castigare to punish, chastise; castus pure + agere to lead, drive. See {Chaste}, {Act}, and cf …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 chastening — n. punishment, correction; chastisement chas·ten || tʃeɪsn v. punish, discipline; criticize harshly; purify …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 5 chastening — n. Chastisement, correction, discipline, humbling …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 6 chastening — noun a rebuke for making a mistake • Syn: ↑correction, ↑chastisement • Derivationally related forms: ↑chastise (for: ↑chastisement) • Hypernyms: ↑rebuke, ↑ …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 7 Lawrence Summers — 8th Director of the National Economic Council In office January 20, 2009 – December 31, 2010 Deputy Diana Farrell …

    Wikipedia

  • 8 Hebrews 12 — 1 Wherefore seeing we also are compassed about with so great a cloud of witnesses, let us lay aside every weight, and the sin which doth so easily beset us, and let us run with patience the race that is set before us, 2 Looking unto Jesus the… …

    The King James version of the Bible

  • 9 punish — punish, chastise, castigate, chasten, discipline, correct mean to inflict pain, loss, or suffering upon a person for his sin, crime, or fault. Punish implies imposing a penalty for violation of law, disobedience of authority, or intentional… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 10 punishment — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) Applying a penalty for an offense Nouns 1. punishment; chastisement, chastening; correction, castigation; discipline, infliction, trial; judgment, penalty; retribution; thunderbolt, nemesis; requital,… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 11 chasten — chas|ten [ˈtʃeısən] v [T usually passive] formal [Date: 1500 1600; Origin: chaste to chasten (12 17 centuries), from Old French chastier, from Latin castigare; CASTIGATE] to make someone realize that their behaviour was wrong or mistaken ▪ Party… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 12 chasten — v.tr. 1 (esp. as chastening, chastened adjs.) subdue, restrain (a chastening experience; chastened by his failure). 2 discipline, punish. 3 moderate. Derivatives: chastener n. Etymology: obs. chaste (v.) f. OF chastier f. L castigare CASTIGATE …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 13 Chasten — Chas ten (ch[=a] s n), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Chastened} ( s nd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Chastening}.] [OE. chastien, OF. Chastier, F. Ch?tier, fr. L. castigare to punish, chastise; castus pure + agere to lead, drive. See {Chaste}, {Act}, and cf.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 14 Chastened — Chasten Chas ten (ch[=a] s n), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Chastened} ( s nd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Chastening}.] [OE. chastien, OF. Chastier, F. Ch?tier, fr. L. castigare to punish, chastise; castus pure + agere to lead, drive. See {Chaste}, {Act}, and cf …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 15 Moralize — Mor al*ize (m[o^]r al*[imac]z), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Moralized} (m[o^]r al*[imac]zd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Moralizing} (m[o^]r al*[imac]*z[i^]ng).] [Cf. F. moraliser.] 1. To apply to a moral purpose; to explain in a moral sense; to draw a moral from …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 16 Moralized — Moralize Mor al*ize (m[o^]r al*[imac]z), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Moralized} (m[o^]r al*[imac]zd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Moralizing} (m[o^]r al*[imac]*z[i^]ng).] [Cf. F. moraliser.] 1. To apply to a moral purpose; to explain in a moral sense; to draw a… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 17 Moralizing — Moralize Mor al*ize (m[o^]r al*[imac]z), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Moralized} (m[o^]r al*[imac]zd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Moralizing} (m[o^]r al*[imac]*z[i^]ng).] [Cf. F. moraliser.] 1. To apply to a moral purpose; to explain in a moral sense; to draw a… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 18 Nevertheless — Nev er*the*less , adv. & conj. [Never + the (see {The} by that) + less.] Not the less; notwithstanding; in spite of that; yet. [1913 Webster] No chastening for the present seemeth to be joyous, but grievous; nevertheless, afterward it yieldeth… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 19 chasten — transitive verb (chastened; chastening) Etymology: alteration of obsolete English chaste to chasten, from Middle English, from Anglo French chastier, from Latin castigare, from castus + igare (from agere to drive) more at act Date: 13th century 1 …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 20 douche — noun Etymology: French, from Italian doccia, from docciare to douche, from doccia water pipe, probably back formation from doccione conduit, from Latin duction , ductio means of conveying water, from ducere to lead more at tow Date: 1766 1. a. a… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary