Ability

  • 1 Ability — may be: * aptitude * ability to pay * Intelligence * physical ability * skill * expertiseAbility: The way to do something.Ability may also refer to: * Ability score, in role playing games * Ability Plus Software, makers of the office suite… …

    Wikipedia

  • 2 ability — I noun ableness, adaptability, adeptness, adequacy, aptitude, aptness, capability, capacity, competence, competency, enablement, facultas, faculty, fitness, fittedness, ingenium, mastership, mastery, potentiality, potestas, proficiency, prowess,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 3 Ability — A*bil i*ty ([.a]*b[i^]l [i^]*t[y^]), n.; pl. {Abilities} ([.a]*b[i^]l [i^]*t[i^]z). [F. habilet[ e], earlier spelling habilit[ e] (with silent h), L. habilitas aptitude, ability, fr. habilis apt. See {Able}.] The quality or state of being able;… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 ability — UK US /əˈbɪləti/ noun [C or U] ► the power or skill needed to do something, or the fact that someone is able to do something: »There s no doubting her ability. the ability to do sth »A good leader has the ability to motivate people. »We like our… …

    Financial and business terms

  • 5 -ability — suffix expressing ability, fitness, or capacity, from L. abilitas, forming nouns from adjectives ending in abilis (see ABLE (Cf. able)). Not etymologically related to ABILITY (Cf. ability), though popularly connected with it …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 6 -ability — [əbılıti] suffix also ibility [: Old French; Origin: abilité, from Latin abilitas, from abilis; ABLE] makes nouns from adjectives ending in ↑ able and ↑ ible ▪ manageability ▪ suitability …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 7 -ability — [ ə bıləti ] suffix used with adjectives ending in able to make nouns meaning a particular quality: suitability dependability …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 8 ability — (n.) late 14c., from O.Fr. ableté expert at handling (something), from L. habilitatem (nom. habilitas) aptitude, noun of quality from habilis easy to manage, handy (see ABLE (Cf. able)). One case where a Latin silent h failed to make a return in… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 9 ability — n. 1) to demonstrate, display, exhibit, show ability 2) to appreciate, recognize ability 3) creative; exceptional. great, outstanding, remarkable; innate, natural; latent ability 4) an ounce of ability (he doesn t have an ounce of ability) 5)… …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 10 ability — a|bil|i|ty W1S1 [əˈbılıti] n plural abilities [Date: 1400 1500; : Old French; Origin: habilité, from Latin habilitas, from habilis; ABLE] 1.) the state of being able to do something ability to do sth ▪ the ability to walk …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 11 ability — noun 1 skill/power to do sth ADJECTIVE ▪ exceptional, extraordinary, great, outstanding, remarkable, uncanny ▪ inherent, innate, natural …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 12 ability — 01. She has a natural [ability] in sports, and seems to do well in any sport she tries. 02. His [ability] to run 6 miles in 40 minutes is incredible for a man his age. 03. If you are [able] to come to the party, everyone will be really happy to… …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 13 ability — a|bil|i|ty [ ə bıləti ] noun count or uncount *** 1. ) something you are capable of doing: ability to do something: Tiredness can seriously impair your ability to drive. a ) skill you have at a particular type of work, educational subject, etc.:… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 14 ability — [[t]əbɪ̱lɪti[/t]] ♦♦ abilities 1) N SING: N to inf, oft with poss Your ability to do something is the fact that you can do it. The public never had faith in his ability to handle the job... He has the ability to bring out the best in others. Syn …

    English dictionary

  • 15 ability — /euh bil i tee/, n., pl. abilities. 1. power or capacity to do or act physically, mentally, legally, morally, financially, etc. 2. competence in an activity or occupation because of one s skill, training, or other qualification: the ability to… …

    Universalium

  • 16 ability — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) n. power, skill, competency, capacity, capability, aptitude, faculty, talent (inf.), know how; what it takes (si). Ant., inability, incompetency. II (Roget s IV) n. 1. [Capacity to act] Syn. aptitude,… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 17 ability — The power to perform a mental or physical task either before or after training. Social psychologists usually distinguish ability from aptitude, the natural ability to acquire or learn a body of knowledge, sometimes measured by an aptitude test.… …

    Dictionary of sociology

  • 18 ability — noun /əˈbɪlɪti,əˈbɪlɪɾi/ a) The quality or state of being able.<!; power to perform, whether physical, moral, intellectual, conventional, or legal; capacity; skill or competence in doing; sufficiency of strength, skill, resources, etc.; in the …

    Wiktionary

  • 19 ABILITY — (Roget s Thesaurus II) Index ability noun ability (2), agility, comer, common sense, dexterity, discernment, expert, faculty, fluency, forte, grasp …

    English dictionary for students

  • 20 ability — noun (plural ties) Etymology: Middle English abilite, from Anglo French, from Latin habilitat , habilitas, from habilis apt, skillful more at able Date: 14th century 1. a. the quality or state of being able < ability of the …

    New Collegiate Dictionary